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The Crescent 



VOLUME XXXV 



NEWBERG, OREGON. APRIL 16, 1924 



NUMBER 10 



J 



ENDOWMENT CAMPAIGN 
TAKES FORWARD STEP 

Friends of Pacific Enthusiastic Over 
Gigantic Drive 



The Pacific College Campaign is 
under way. Each day now sees 
something tangible done. Confidence 
and enthusiasm are distinctly on the 
up-grade. 

After a considerable number of 
meetings of members of the Board 
and other interested persons, "n 
meeting was called at the College 
on March 17. Over seventy loyal 
friends of Pacific College responded 
to this call. As the meeting pro- 
gressed and the whole situation wa.j 
fully revealed, enthusiasm and hope 
began to be manifested. Questions 
were frankly asked and as frankly 
answered. 

Dr. T. W. Hester was asked to 
outline the plan by which the act- 
ual raising of the money was to be 
accomplished. This plan contem- 
plates the building of an organiza- 
tion, composed of at least seventy- 
five persons. In addition to the 
Finance Director and the President 
of the College, there will be three 
Division Leaders. Each Division 
Leader will have associated with 
him five Captains and each Cal tain 
will have five workers associated 
with him on his team. It is ex- 
pected that each one of these Divis- 
ion Leaders will be an alumnus of 
Pacific College. In this connection 
it might be interesting to know that 
Dr. T. W. Hester and Dr. J. Ray 
Pemberton have consented to take 
the leadership of a division. 

Following the meeting which was 
held in Newberg, a meeting similar 
in character was held in Salem. 
Five of the Interested friends of Pa- 
cific College went from Newberg to 
Salem to assist in holding this meet- 
ing. Much the same spirit was 
manifested in the Salem meeting as 
had been manifested in the meeting 
in Newberg. 

One of the finest and most ap- 
preciated manifestations of the 
growing interest in Pacific College 
was the offer of the management of 
the Newberg Graphic. Mr. Nottage 
and Mr. Dimond volunteered to put 
out a special edition of the New- 
berg Graphic. The four pages of 
the outside sheet will be occupied 
wholly with cuts and write-ups, 
telling of Pacific College. Arrange- 
ments have been made for this issue 
to go to a large number of People 
In addition to the regular subscrib- 
ers to the paper. 

On Monday, April 7, College 
Headquarters were opened in the 
down town section at Newberg. 
The Imperial Hotel was kind enough 
to re arrange its facilites in such a 
way as to give us the large parlor 
room just over the lobby. This is 
a large attractive room. Some fur- 
niture was taken from the college 
and this was supplemented by furni- 
ture donated by W. W. Hollings- 
worth & Son. The room is now 
equipped for efficient work and is 
easy of access for the Newberg 
friends of Pacific College. 

Miss Harriett Hodgin, an alumna 



(Continued on page four) 



COLLEGE DEFEATS ACADEMY IN 
OPENING GAME OF BASEBALL 

The baseball season at Pacific 
formally opened to students and out- 
side enthusiasts Monday, March 31. 
when Coach Michener's nine met the 
Academy team in their first prac- 
tice game. The previous Friday 
had been chosen for this event, but 
on account of the rain it was put. 
off, and the small turnout is to be 
accounted for by the fact that only 
a few of the students knew about 
the game Monday afternoon. Six 
innings were played at the end of 
which the score stood 15 to 9 in 
favor of the college. Order was pre- 
served and fair decisions rendered 
by Mr. Lynn B. Ferguson, who acted 
as umpire. 

The College took the lead in the 
first inning with five runs, and it 
waj not until the second that the 
Academy scored, making 1 run, 
against a single tally for the Col- 
lege. In the third the College piled 
up C more runs, holding the Acade- 
my stationary, while the fourth in- 
ning saw 2 more runs tor the Acad- 
emy and none for the College. 

The "preps" made a great sprint 
in the next inning with 6 runs. The 
College bagged 2, and a single run 
in the sixth brought the total score 
up to 15, as against the Academy's 
9. 

The lineup on both sides was 
more or less provisional, and varied 
considerably throughout the game. 
Woodward and Hanke hurled to 
Nordyke on the College nine, while 
Lienard and Haworth pitched for 
the Academy and Everest caught. 

Considering the limited amount 
of field work permitted by the 
weather since the arrival of base- 
ball equipment, both teams showed 
up in good form. Coach Michener 
is to be commended on the enthusi- 
asm and the effort he is putting 
forth to insure a winning team. 
Most of the material in the Collego 
is new although somewhat experi- 
enced; only a small nucleus of last 
year's men is left as a basis for 
this year's team. Good practice will 
be obtained from time to time in 
playing the high school team, which 
has a good start on the season and 
is showing up fine. 



ACADEMY ORATORICAL CONTEST i PEACE CONTEST RANK 
PROVES TO BE LARGE SUCCESS! mm ,„ fflST0Ry 



Pacific Academy's representative 
in the oratorical contest on the 
Constitution between the private 
schools of Oregon and Southern 
Washington will be Floyd Lienard, 
who took first place in the local 
contest with the oration, "The For- 
mation of the Constitution." Gwen- 
dolyn Hanson received second place 
j with "The Negro and the Constitu- 
tion," and Esther Gulley carried 
third place with "The Constitution 
and the Immigrant." The other 
three contestants had very good 
orations, George Foott presenting 
"The Constitution;" D|alsy Blsbee 
speaking on "The Eighth Amend- 
ment," and Eldon Everest giving the 
"Ship of State." 

The contest between the private 
schools will be held in Portland in 
a few days and the winner of this 
contest will compete with the best 
high school orators of the state for 
the state title. Oregon's represen- 
tative will then compete with other 
state orators for the Pacific Coast 
championship at Los Angeles. The 
winner of this goes to Washington, 
D. C, for the national contest. 



Willamette University Takes First 
In Keen Contest 



CHAPEL NOTES 

The greater part of the chapel 
period of March 24 was devoted to 
speeches honoring our winner of the 
oratorical contest, and to the discus- 
sion of similar future successes, 
which we hope for. The first talk 
was given by Miss Lewis on "As We 
Used to Do It in the Good Old Days." 
Miss Lewis' discussion began with 
the year 1905 when Walter Miles 
won the state oratorical contest. 
Katherlne Romig won at McMinn- 
ville in 1907. At this time P. C. 
hold four medals which was the 
largest number hold by any one 
college in the state. 

Presindent Pennington was the 
Seconal speaker. His subject was. 
"The Glorious Present." He highlv 
praised Mr. Gettmann's fine work 
and gave the following reasons for 
his winning: He had a live sub- 
ject, handled it fairly, and it bore 
a genuine plea for a cause, the ora- 



DRAMATICS 

The forthcoming Student Body 
plays are getting rapidly under 
way. The able coaching of Mrs. 
Conover in "Tickless Time" and of 
Miss Lewis in "The Neighbors" will 
certainly develop a creditable eve- 
ning's entertainment. 

"Tickless Time" is a roaring farce 
which will surely please, especially 
in view of the able cast who will 
Present It: 

Ian Joyce Herbert Owen 

Eloise Joyce Esther Haworth 

Mrs. Stubbs Olive Armstrong 

Eddy Knight Eugene Hibbs 

Annie-Cook Zelle Justus 

"The Neighbors" by Zona Gale, 
was designed by its author to pro- 
mote the spirit of neighborliness, as 
evidenced by the whimsical royalty 
she requires. It will be presented 
by the following cast: 

Grandma Albie Smith 

Mis' DIantha Abel .... Marie Hester 

Inez Louise Nelson 

Mis' Elmira Moran . .Lucille Clough 

Mis' Trot Reta Hansen 

Mis' Carrie Ellworth . . Mary Elliott 

Ezra Williams Edgar Street 

Peter Albert Windell 



On Friday evening, April 4, rep- 
resentatives of seven Oregon colleges 
and universities met in Eugene to 
participate in the State Peace Ora- 
torical contest. The schools repre- 
sented by orators were the Oregon 
Agricultural college, Linfield col- 
i lege, Willamette university, Pacific 
college, Pacific university, Eugene 
Bible university, and the University 
of Oregon. All had good represen- 
tatives, and remarks were heard to 
the effect that the contest as a 
whole ranked higher than previous 
ones. 

The contest, which was held in 
Villard hall, was to have started at 
7:45 p. m., but owing first to the 
muddy roads and later to the speed 
cop, the representatives from 0. A. 
C. were so late that the contest 
started at about 8:30. 

Clive Saiz, of Albany college, then 
called the assembly to order and In- 
troduced Miss Maurine Brown of the 
State Normal as the presiding offi- 
cer for the evening. Miss Brown 
took charge, simply announcing the 
name of each oration as it appeared 
on the program. 

The representatives of the differ- 
ent schools and the titles of their 
orations follow in the order in 
which each appeared on the pro- 
gram. Henry Simmond of Pacific 
university, "Peace Oration;" Mervin 
Good of the Oregon Agricultural 
college, "A Nation's Soul;" Leland 
Chapin of Willamette university, 
"The International Mind;" Helen 
Hester of Pacific college, "It Must 
Not Be Again;" Frank Cunningham 
of Eugene Bible University, "Amer- 
ica's Sacred Trust;" Tel Baker of 
University of Oregon, "The New 
Peace;" and Harold Proppe of Lin- 
field college, "Waging War Against 
War." 

The results of the decisions of the 
judges gave Willamette first place, 
tied Oregon Agricultural college and 
University of Oregon for second 
place, tied Eugent Bible university 
and Linfield college for third place, 
gave Pacific college fourth, and Pa- 
cific university fifth place. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The new officers for the Y. M. C. 
A. cabinet are: President, Harland 
Renard; vice president, Hubert 
i Armstrong; secretary, Carl Crane; 
treasurer, John Cbenevert. 

Last Wednesday's meeting was 
open to discussion on the subject, 
"How our Y. M. C. A. meetings may 
be improved." Many very excellent 
thoughts were given, and if they 
are followed the attendance will 
surely be doubled for the coming 
year. 

tion was well written and well de- 
livered. 

Professor Perisho concluded the 
program by speaking on "The Still 



(Continued on page two) 



TREFIAN 

The Trefian society met as usual 
on Wednesday afternoon, and for 
the first time with the Academy 
girls gone. The loss in numbers 
was partially made up by three new 
members, Allie Sn^lth, May Pear- 
son and Lela Pearson. A short busi- 
ness meeting was held in which the 
offices vacated by the Academy girls 
were filled. Social committee chair- 
manship was filled by Florence 
Heater, and Zella Straw filled the 
office of treasurer. 

The critic's report was given and 
everyone followed the leader (Flor 
ence Lee) to the Kanyon. There fol- 
lowd toasting of apples over a camp- 
fire and eating of popcorn. After 
all the food was gone everyone left, 
all agreeing that the Kanyon made 
a lovely meeting place. 



THE CRESCENT 



El. .'ered as second-class mail matter 
at Postoffice at New berg, Ore. 

Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 

EDITORIAL 

Ridilor-in-chief Florence Lee 

Associate Editor Ivor Jones 

Departmental Editor 

Helen Robertson 

Faculty Advisor R. W. Lewi-* 

REPORTORIAL 

Society Edna Doree; Sports-- 
Howard Nottage; Personals — Flor- 
ence Heater; Y. W. C. A. — Iris Hew- 
itt; Y. M. C. A. — Ralph Hester; 
Chapel —Emma Fort; Trefian — Hel- 
en Robertson; Commercial — Kath- 
erine Pettingil; Alumni — Miss 
Britt. 

MANAGERIAL 

Business Manager. . .Floyd Lienard 
Circulation Manager, Wilbur Elliott 



Terms: SI. 00 the Year in Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 



THE SONG OP A SHIRT 

The shirt that Napoleon wore 
when he died- -of ulcer in the stom- 
ach and bitter disappointment — 
will be sold at auction by the de- 
scendants of Archambault, Napo- 
leon's servant. 

With it will go a piece of his cof- 
fin and the glass from which he 
drank last. 

That trash isn't worth a cent. 
But who will write a book making- 
it clear that Napoleon ruined his 
health and lost his energy for lack 
of which he dilly-dallied in Rusia 
and was beaten in Waterloo because 
he prided himself on eating too fast 
and sleeping only four hours. That 
book might be worth millions to 
some of America's useful builders 
that live as foolishly as Napoleon 
did. 



TREFIAN 

A very interesting and worth- 
while program was given at Tref- 
ian last Wednesday. After a pre- 
liminary business meeting in which 
two vacancies were filled: Mi's. 
Michener having resigned her place 
as faculty advisor in order to be 
with the Academy girls' society, and 
Florence Lee resigning as president: 
Miss Lewis was elected as faculty 
advisor and Mary Elliott for presi- 
dent. 

Miss Lewis gave a very interest- 
ing talk on modern drama and the 
turn the theatre is taking in the 
present day. One of the things she 
brought out is the tendency of the 
modern producer to simplify the 
setting of the stage to such an ex- 
tent that the art of acting is an art 
undetracted by elaborate settings 
and scenery and the actor must de- 
pend upon himself to hold the at- 
tention of his audience. 

Esther Haworth, accompanied by 
Helen Robertson sang "I, a Nightin- 
gale," by Charles Wakefield Cad- 
man much to the pleasure of all 
those present. Another interesting 
number, a piano solo, "Mountain 
Stream," was played by Hilma Hen- 
drickson, and made us all wish to 
be in the mountains, especially as 
the day was unusually warm. 

Louise Nelson gave an unusual 
version of the religious drama, 
"The Passion Play of Oberammer- 
gau. The way in which this play 
dominates the lives of the people of 
Oberammergau, the manner in 
which the actors are chosen, and 
the story of Anton Lang, the present 
Christus was depicted very faithful- 
ly. 

Eva Miles completed the program 
with a talk on the art of acting. 
The ability to speak good English 
is one of the most important requis- 
ites of the good actor and should be 
a thing worth acquiring for every- 
one. The critic's report was given 
and the meeting adjourned and ev- 
eryone voiced the opinion that the 
program would do credit to any col- 
lege literary society. 



REGENERATION 

Judge Bartlett, in Philadelphia, 
decided that when grape juice fer- 
ments, that is "an act of God," and 
of course, nobody can be punished 
for God's own act. That's an im- 
portant decision if sustained. It 
means that you may squeeze the 
juice from grapes, and when fer- 
mentation produces alcohol you may 
drink it and give it to your friends. 
In other words, making wine is le- 
gal, since God, and not man, doe,* 
the work. 

Some higher court probably will 
alter that decision, which might, 
make wine the national drink, in 
place of bootleg whiskey. 



What if the steno typed the letter 
just as it is oftentimes dictated: 

"New York — what date is this. - 
10th or 11th — well, date it the 10th 
anyway— I should have written this 
guy yesterday. 

"J. — what's that lobster's initials 
— J. G. Brown, I guess — look it up, 
State Street — look up the number, 
too, Chicago. 

"My dear Mr. Brown — no, I 
don't want to call that pirate that- — 
say 'Dear Sir:' 

"Your favor of — urn -let's see — 
hamme that letter -the 22 nd re- 
ceived -remember it's 'ei,' not 'ie' — 
and contents noted. We can let you 
have a dozen gross, nice fresh goods 
— remind me if he comes across to 
ship him some of that stuff return- 
ed last month from Pittsburgh -for 
eleven fifteen f. o. b. New York. 
This is bottom price — maybe we can 
work off some more of that old 
stuff on this skate, he's always 



CHENEY CONCTRT COMPANY 

CLOSES SPLENDID LYCEUM, Black 122 



SOPHOMORE PARTY 

The Sophomores were hosts to the 
Seniors at a most enjoyable "very 
hard times" affair on April 5. Just 
as the twilight fell the motley crew 
merrily gathered. The Seniors in 
company with Professor Newlin and 
Miss Clark were treated to a bumpy 
but thrilling ride in "ye old time 
way," behind horses. The Sopho- 
mores followed by motor, giving 
ample illumination until all arrived 
at the home of Miss Nina Johnson. 
As wraps were removed many hard 
time yarns were told and apologies 
made for the general and specific 
ragged appearance. During the eve- 
ning it was discovered that many of 
those present were masquerading 
under false names, if reports be 
true. The games were all unique , 
and particularly fitted for the occa- 
sion and those present. Paul Brown 
was awarded the prize of a basket 
of vegetables, etc., for having the 
best costume. | 

A most delicious mulligan stew 
filled the remaining vacancies to 
the tune of various, and varied in- ! 
conveniences. The Sophomores I 
proved themselves very clever hosts | 
and gave a good time to all. The 
Johnsons fihowed themselves to be, 



The closing number of the Pa- 
cific college lyceum course was giv- 
en Friday, March 28, by the Cheney 
Concert company, featuring the fa- 
mous White House organ chimes. 

Mr. Cheney is an accomplished 
'cellist and rendered some very 
pleasing numbers on that instru- 
ment. 

Mrs. Cheney, who gave the clever 
readings and pianologues, was be- 
yond doubt the most appreciated by 
the audience at large. 

Miss Cheney proved herself a tal- 
ented artist on the violin, and Miss 
Wright supplied excellent accom- 
paniment on the piano. 

Before the program President 
Pennington reviewed the proposed 
course for next year. Owing to the 
failure of this last course to pay for 
itself, the prospects for the course 
next year are rather dubious with- 
out the assured support of the stu- 
dents and townspeople. 



CHAPEL NOTES 

(Continued from Page one) 



More Glorious Future." Professor 
Perisho believes that we can do "it" 
again, and he desires that more in- 
terest be shown in the local con- 
tests. 

Mr. Beam, a Student Volunteer 
secretary spoke in chapel March 24. 
Mr. Beam emphasized the greatness 
of the Indianapolis convention and 
what such a gathering of students 
of all races means to the solving of 
national problems and the advance 
of peace for the world. The con- 
vention was really a foreign mis- 
sionary convention and was a fel- 
lowship of races. He brought out 
strongly that Jesus was the way, 
and that his way is the only way, 
and is a practical road to follow. Mr. 
Beam expects to go to Africa this 
fall. 

On March 28 Mrs. Michener pre- 
sented one of the most interesting 
and entertaining chapel talks of the 
year. Her subject was "Change," 
not the kind of change we call cur- 
rency, but the change in human na- 
ture. The talk was started by a dis- 
cussion of puns, and a tombstone 
inscription was read to illustrate the 
point. During Mrs. Michener's talk 
she spun helpful hints around Joa- 
quin Miller's "The Man From Bos- 
ton," and Whittier's "Pearl of 
Price," which were interestingly 
and expressively recited. Mrs. Mich- 
ener closed with a musical reading. 
"Tale of a Twilight Bell," which 
was especially enjoyed by all. Eva 
Miles played the accompaniment for 
the last number. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



NEWBERG LAUNDRY 

Good Work. Good Service. 

TRY US 



royal entertainers. 



H. H. 



looking for cheap junk — and we ad 
vise you to order promptly as we 
cannot guarantee to have the goods 
at this figure very long. When yon 
arc in New York run up and see us 

I suppose I'll have to chase tho 
rube out to lunch somewhere— and 
we will go out and have a bite. Get 
that letter right out so we can ship 
that stuff before it falls apart. 

"Trusting we may be favored 
with your order and so forth. Use 
the old stationery." 



BOYS! 

That new Student Electric 
lamp to study by. 

GIRLS! 

The "Flapper" Electric Curler. 



larkin-Prince Hard- 
ware Go. 

Service ! Service ! Service ! 



Office White 22 



DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 
714 FIRST STREET 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 
THE REXALL STORE 
Lynn B. Ferguson 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



FRANK B. LAYMAN 
Attorney-at-Law 



CITY HALL 



STUDENTS— 

For the easiest shave 
and most up-to-date 
hair cut, go to 

JAMES McGUIRE 

OPPOSITE -THE POST OFFICE 



CREDE'S MARKET 

Our Specialty: 

Our own make of sugar cured 
hams, bacon, and bacon backs, 
lard and all kinds of sausage. 

Quality and Service Counts 



F. E. ROIXINS 
Jeweler 

Fine Watch Repairing 
Pens Straightened 

711 FIRST STREET 
Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



An Electric Washing Machine 

Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



Anderson Motor 
Company 

STAR AND 
STUDEBAKER 

Sales and Service 

Associated Oil Products 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



THE P. A. ASKUS 



VOLUME I 



NUMBER 7 



THE P. A. ASKUS 

Entered in the Crescent as very 
classy matter. 

Published every time by the Cres- 
cent. 

Philip Haworth Editor 

George Foott Assoc. Ed. 

Retha Tucker .... Fourth Yr. News 

Rose Ellen Hale Third Yr. News 

Johanna Gerrits . . . Second Pr. News 

Mabel Kendall First Yr. News 

Philip Gatch Joke Editor 

Editorial Policy 

1. Get the best news, in the be3t 
style, and we'll have the best paper. 

2. Boost Pacific Academy. 

3. Back Pacific College. 

Terms: Pay for the Crescent in 
advance and you get the Askus. Buy 
a single copy and you get it anyway. 

GIRLS LITERARY SOCIETY FOR 
PACIFIC ACADEMY 

Have you heard of the girls' new 
Academy literary society? Well, it's 
well on its way. The constitution 
will soon be completed, and many 
other plans are being made in try- 
ing to establish a worth-while pres- 
ent society as well as a future one. 
As yet though the name for this or- 
ganization has not been selected. 
But we assure you that it will not 
be long, for each member is working 
hard. We have several good sug- 
gestions already, but we thought it 
best to take a little more time in 
choosing a name that would perhaps 
last for several years at least. 



FOURTH YEAR 

Philip has suddenly become 
"Teacher's Pet." He was the only 
one who did not have to stand up in 
English class to give his report. 

Mildred C. — "George, you remind 
me of a person I used to know. He 
was kind of half-witted. ..." 

There have been some indications 
of spring fever. Ivor was quite ser- 
ious for awhile. 

We have missed Robert Shattuck. 
He has been out of school for some 
time with the "flu." 

I would like George, Philip, Ben- 
nie and Ivor to understand that my 
desk is not a public waste-paper 
basket. Signed, Retha Tucker. 

All the members of the Ameri- 
can history class have been working 
on orations for the National Orator- 
ical contest. Not all are entering 
the contest however. Those who 
are entering the contest are George 
Footte, Floyd Llenard, Eldon Ever- 
est, Daisy Bisbee, Esther Gulley, 
and Gwendolyn Hansen. Judging 
from the amount of time they have 
been spending on their orations, 
they ought to have some good ones. 

The Suicide club seems to be pros- 
pering quite well. According to sta- 
tistics just gathered the cause seems 
to be spreading somewhat. Maybe 
it can settle the difficulties of the 
town's government, who knows. 



THIRD YEAR 

Information wanted — Did Prexie 
have any salt in his pocket when he 
was chasing the robin over the cam- 
pus. 

We are glad that Aletha and Rosa 
are hoth In school again after their 
illness. 

J. G. — "We went in cars part of 
the way and rode the rest of the 
way." 

Be sure to buy a Glee Club ticket, 
remember the girls supported you. 

Ask George if he is any relation 
to "Old Faithful." 



SECOND YEAR 

Following is a prescription for a 
good time: 

One sunny April Fool's day. 
Three cars. 
Fourteen people. 

Previous study of description and 
the relation between art and litera- 
ture. 

Fourteen lunches and a mountain. 
Leave out the English and study 
periods. 

Mix all this thoroughly and you 
will have the English II class on 
Parrett Mountain in the cottage of 
a painter who is explaining his art 
and exhibiting his pictures to them. 
We guarantee that this compound 
will make fourteen happy people 
and two beautiful pictures for the 
English class room, and pleasant 
memories. 

We have invited ourselves to havo 
lunch with "Doc" Crozer who is now 
the chief cook and bottle washer at 
home. 

The second-year boys have been 
very successful in winning their 
tournaments from their opponents. 



spinal column column is a bunch of 
loose bones going up the back. My 
head sits on one end and I sit on 
the other. 



Teacher — "Johnny, did yon spit 
in that waste basket?" 

Johnny — "No, ma'am, I missed 
it." 



FIRST YEAR 

It was a great relief to the Alge- 
bra I class after hearing their grades 
read, to be reminded that it was 
April Fool's day. 

The First Years have received an- 
swers to their letters to Vermillion 
Grove, Illinois. 

The First Years are hoping that 
their turn will soon come to make 
a trip to the mountains. 

Bertha May has been smelt 
"hunting" on the Sandy recently. 
She was very successful. 

Mrs. Michener — "Do you know 
what the meaning of stockholder 
is?" 

Roy — "It is a man who holds 
cows." 



SOCIETY NEWS 

Bernice Hinshaw and Rose Ellen 
Hale entertained a number of their 
friends at the Van Blaricom home 
Saturday evening, April 5. The oc- 
casion was the birthdays of the two 
hostesses. 

Contests and games of unique 
nature and intense interest provided 
entertainment for the guests who 
outdid themselves in their merri- 
ment. No more successful party has 
been given this year. 

The guests present were: Misses 
Ruth Lee, Retha Tucker, Daisy Bis- 
bee, Gwendolyn Hanson, Rosa 
Abishier, Aletha Allen, Olive Ken- 
dall, Elsie Reid and Ruth Campbell; 
and Messrs. Philip Haworth, George 
Foott, Floyd Lienard, Glen Brown, 
Eldon Everest, Ben Huntington, 
Theodore Chamberlain, William 
Sweet, Stanley Kendall, Wilbur El- 
liott, Wesley Hollingsworth and 
Ivor Jones. 



WHO'S WHO 

The noted inventors, Bill .Sweet 
and Phil Haworth, have constructed 
and patented a new improved elec- 
troscope, spark gap, static machine 
for the physics lab. It is, according 
to advance press agents, absolutely 
infallible and so simple that a child 
can operate it with ease. If you 
will send fifty cents to the Electro- 
Static Spark Co., Inc., at Pacific 
Academy, blue prints and, pictures 
of the new machine will be mailed 
to you at once. 

Floyd says he has been preaching 
to the vacant seats in chapel every 
vacant period for several days. We 
think the chapel seats will surely 
understand his oration by this time 

The Friday before spring vacation 
the English IV class entertained 
themselves with an interesting 
Irish program of Irish stories, Irish 
poetry, a theme on St. Patrick and 
a debate. The debate was given by 
Philip Haworth and Bennie Hunt- 
ington. The question was, "Resolv- 
ed that green is not a suitable color 
for Ireland and Irish people." We 
learned some astonishing facts 
from this debate, one of which is 
that red is a more suitable color for 
Ireland and Irish people, for several 
different reasons, one of which is 
quite evident. 



3. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 

Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



FAIR VARIETY STORE 

Wallace & Son 



We sell everything in Notions 
Come in and look around 



TENNIS BALLS 
Fresh from factory every month. 

Don't think that we don't have 
BASEBALL goods, because we do 

PARKER HARDWARE CO. 



SMILE AWHILE 

MissLee — "What would you do if 
I said: 'Take your feet out of the 
window?' " 

Fred R. — (removing feet from 
window noiselessly) — "We would 
take the hint." 



H. H. — "Are you going to church 
tonight?" 

E. M.— "Yes." 

H. H. — "Have you a date?" 

E. M.- "May I?" 



THE PERIL FROM GIFTS WITH 
DESIGN 

A houn' dog had located the lair 
of a raccoon in a hollow tree. The 
houn' spent much effort in scratch- 
ing at the tree and barking, while 
Mr. Coon sat quietly out of his 
reach, grinning at his futile efforts. 

Finally Mr. Houn', realizing that 
his houn' tactics were unavailing, 
decided to adopt the methods of his 
master — of pretending friendship 
through bringing to Mr. Coon choice 
bits of food. At first he dropped 
the food near the tree; afterward, 
each time he left it further away, 
in order to inveigle Mr. Coon from 
his safe retreat. One morning Mr. 
Coon poked his nose out of his door, 
and looking cautiously about spied 
Mr. Houn' hiding in the bushes 
near by. 

"Good morning," said Mr. Coon. 
"You have been most kind to bring 
me such delicious things to eat; but 
why do you not leave them near my 
door now, as you did at first?" 

"Oh, well," replied Mr. Houn', 
with all the sang-froid he could 
muster, "because it seemed to me 
you needed exercise as well as food." 

"Thank you," answered Mr. Coon. 
"I think I understand your extreme 
concern for my welfare. I shall 
likewise be careful that you are not 
in hiding when I take my exercise. 
I am reminded that charity calcu- 
lated on terms of expediency is igno- 
ble.' 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



In an exam the physiology teach- 
er asked the following question: 1 
"Give a definition for the spinal ^ 
column." 

She received the following an- j 
swer from a brilliant student: "The 



Newberg Graphic 

FINE PRINTING 

OF ALL KINDS 



C. J. BREIER COMPANY 

Everything: in Men's Furnishings 

at Reasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



K1ENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 

Musical Merchandise 
MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 

Best of Bread: Finest Cakes. 
Pies like Mother used to make. 



For good things to eat 
Van's Grocery can't be beat. 

J. L. VAN BLARICOM 

Phone White 114 
Corner First and Meridian 



BOB WALKER 
Shoe Shine Parlor 

Ladies' Suede Shoes a Speciality 
CANDIES AND GUM 
STAGE DEPOT 



MICHELIN TIRES and TUBES 
VULCANIZING and REPAIRS 

DOYLE'S TIRE SHOP 

Phone Red 244 



You Name It and 
We Will Have It 

If it is something to eat or wear. 



Miller Mercantile Co. 



"Good Goods" 



< 



A FORD 

Is what you want. Fords are 
what we have. Come in and take 
your pick. 

NEWBERG MOTOR CO. 
v J 



DR. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physician & Surgeon 

Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171 
Office over U. S. National Bank 



E. C. SAIRD 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 

Phone Red 37 
J 



TALK AND EAT CLUB 

The Talk and Eat club met 
: Thursday, March 20, at the home of 
: Professor Perisho on Hancock street. 
• All members except four were pres- 
; ent. While the others were con- 
; sinning numberless sandwiches, 
j olives, cookies and hot chocolate, 
Professor Conover spoke on "How to 
Use Your Minds." Although the 
I subject did not seem fitting to the 
. situation, yet the discussion was 
) very stimulating and practical. 
Professor Conover suggested as his 
reason for reviewing this book of 
Horry D. Kitson, the advisability of 
making this or some similar text a 
required course for all freshmen. 

E. M. H. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



DR. A. M. DAVIS DR. I. R. ROOT 
DENTISTS 

Over Ferguson's Drug Store 
Phone White 38 



A. C. SMITH 

Dealer in Leather Goods 
Auto Tops a Speciality 

703 First Street 



NEWBERG CYCLE COMPANY 

EARL HUTCHINSON, Prop. 

The Sporting Gocds Store 

Motorcycles, Bicycles, Supplies 
and Repairing 



A LIFE INSURANCE 

With accident Policy- -Just what 
a student needs. 

MRS. MINNIE COOPER 
Resident Agent 1254 First St. 
West Coast Life Newberg, Or. 



Will B. Brooks 
Printer 

410 First St. Phone Black 22 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
Cleaning Pressing Repairing 

RYGG THE TAILOR 

PHONE BLACK 180 



EVANS 
PLUMBING COMPANY 

311 First Street 



You Get Your Money's Worth 
at the 
GEM BARBER SHOP 



Mr. and Mrs. Weesner hospitably 
invited the members of the Talk and 
Eat club to meet at their home 
Thursday evening, April 10. This 
was the third meeting of the club 
and the members are deciding it a 
great success. 

Miss Lee, head of the mathematics 
department of the Academy, told in 
her inimitable way of the wild Hfo 
of the Olympic mountains. She 
spoke especially of the habits of the 
whistler, the bear, the wood-rats, 
and the wood ants. Many interest- 
ing personal experiences were re- 
lated. Although some rather extra- 
ordinary tales were told, the lis- 
eners were assured they were 
"really" so. Miss Lee is well fitted 
to speak on this subject as she has 
spent a number of summers in the 
mountains. M. C. S. 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

School Supplies and 
Stationery 

H. A. Cooley, Proprietor 



A. MORRIS 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



FRESHMAN PARTY 

The Freshmen met Saturday eve- 
ning, April 5, in room 14 of the col- 
lege building for a party Gamcw 
were first played on the lawn, after 
which everyone went indoors and 
more games were enjoyed. 

Next fortunes were told with 
a bottle. The Freshmen were all 
very glad to learn that Edgar 
Street has the biggest feet of any- 
one in the class: Marguerite Beck 
talks the most; that Mr. Miehener 
will be bald-headed by the time he 
is twenty-five; and many other 
items of interest. 

After all had had their fortunes 
told, eats and a business meeting 
followed. At 10:30 everyone re- 
luctantly left. 

"They're off," cried the old lady, 
as she viewed the inmates of the in- 
sane asylum. 

And on the other hand — 
"They're off!" cried the monkeys, 
as they backed their tails into the 
lawiimower. 



DR. THOS. W. HESTER 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office in Dixon Building 
NEWBERG, -:- OREGON 



CAMPBELL'S 

CANDIES 



ALWAYS 



The Best 



W. H. BEST 

W. W. HOWETT 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

WATER METERS 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 

Deliver before and after school 
Phone Red C6 
MOORE & SON 



W. W. HOLUNGSWORTH CO. 

STORE OF QUALITY 



500 First St. 



Newberg, Ore. 



YOU WILL LIKE 
Our Shoe Repair Service 
Better and Better Each Day 
ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

JASPER BALES 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOR 
LITTLE MONEY 



WatcheB Jewelry Clocks 

E. G. RELD 
Watch and Clock Repairing 

All Work Guaranteed 
906 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newberg, Oregon 
KEEP YOUR RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



ENDOWMENT CAMPAIGN 



TAKES FORWARD STEP j 

(Continued from page one) 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 

ELGIN VAN BLARICOM 



of Pacific College, is in charge of 
the down town Headquarters and is 
now busily engaged in the accumu- 
lation of a large prospect list. Some- 
thing over 15,000 names have al- 
ready been collected and it is ex- 
pected that this number will be 
doubled before the end of next week. 

At a recent meeting of the Col- 
lege Board, President Pennington, 
Professor Perisho and Professor 
Conover were released from all their 
regular college work in order that 
they might give full time to the 
campaign. Arrangements have 
been made for both President Pen- 
nington's and Professor Conover's 
classes and they are now actively 
helping in the preliminary work of 
the campaign. Arrangements have 
been made for most of Professor 
Perisho's work and he is able now 
to give most of his time toward the 
promotion of the campaign. 

There are many evidences that 
the campaign has been started aus- 
piciously. S. J. M. 



Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 



OVER U. S. BANK 



X-Ray Diagnosis 
GAS ADMINISTERED 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $125,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ESTBLISHED 1889 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



"Rosebud Flour" 

MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFACTORY